This made the day so much more… doable?

This made the day so much more… doable?



(via rj4gui4r)


secretempires:

Unreachable Interior #2416

secretempires:

Unreachable Interior #2416

(via interiorstyledesign)


stunningpicture:

It’s all a matter of perspective

stunningpicture:

It’s all a matter of perspective

(via rj4gui4r)


tastemade:

Nestled in the heart of Venice, on the trendy street Abbot Kinney, lies Salt Air Venice Bistro where you can get delectable, fresh, oceanic fair. There are few things we love more than Lobster Rolls and Monkey Bread and that is exactly what we indulged in during our memorable meal. Executive chef Greg Daniels, knows how to serve-up one heck of a “Connecticut Style” Lobster Roll. (trust us, this is one you do not want to miss) Watch our Tastemade appisode below for a BTS look at this Venice gem.

Gotta try this place.


good:



An Italian mobile library. Wouldn’t it be cool to have one of these in your own community?



YES.

good:

An Italian mobile library. Wouldn’t it be cool to have one of these in your own community?

YES.

(via good)


elcomfortador:

Probably the best photo I have ever taken.

elcomfortador it’s lovely indeed.

elcomfortador:

Probably the best photo I have ever taken.

elcomfortador it’s lovely indeed.

It’s a common and easy enough distinction, this separation of books into those we read because we want to and those we read because we have to, and it serves as a useful marketing trope for publishers, especially when they are trying to get readers to take this book rather than that one to the beach. But it’s a flawed and pernicious division… a debased cultural Puritanism, which insists that the only fun to be had with a book is the frivolous kind, or that it’s necessarily a pleasure to read something accessible and easy. Associating pleasure and guilt in this way presumes an anterior, scolding authority—one which insists that reading must be work.

But there are pleasures to be had from books beyond being lightly entertained. There is the pleasure of being challenged; the pleasure of feeling one’s range and capacities expanding; the pleasure of entering into an unfamiliar world, and being led into empathy with a consciousness very different from one’s own; the pleasure of knowing what others have already thought it worth knowing, and entering a larger conversation.

[…]

The fallacy that the pleasures offered by reading must necessarily be pleasures to which a self-defeating sense of shame is attached offers a very impoverished definition of gratification, whatever book we choose to pull from the shelf.

In a beautiful New Yorker essay, Rebecca Mead, author of My Life in Middlemarch, extols the pleasure of reading to impress yourself.

Here’s to making your own “beach reading” both pleasurable and intelligent.

(via explore-blog)

The Office will not register works produced by nature, animals, or plants. Likewise, the Office cannot register a work purportedly created by divine or supernatural beings…

Examples:

• A photograph taken by a monkey.

• A mural painted by an elephant…

• An application for a song naming the Holy Spirit as the author of the work.

The US Copyright office says you can’t copyright things made by animals, gods, or ghosts (via austinkleon)

#themoreyouknow